Tag Archives: Tips and Tricks

Accent!

Color can be used as an accent to any photograph to bring it to life! In this head shot that you see here, we used and sea foam green guitar with the green accents in the  background to create a very coherent image. The combination of the soft green with the earthy dark brown hues in the image is key in the success of the photograph and really works well with the subject’s look!

Try planning your colors when you’re doing a shoot! Making few elements coordinate in color is a successful way to bring everything together to make the image feel complete.

Happy Shooting.

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Photographing Packaging

At Bohm-Marrazzo Photography we work with all kinds of animals, from the typical dogs and cats to snakes, ferrets, you name it! The images on these packages for ferret products were photographed by us for Petsmart. For our own record we bought some of these products and photographed the montage of our work. However, Photographing packages to look great is not as simple as you’d think. Here are some tips for photographing packaging:

  1. Lighting is key. You want to use even, soft lighting to avoid glaring highlights or deep shadows. You want the surface of the package to be easily readable.
  2. Arrange the products in a simple and pleasing way. This grouping of products is arranged together by propping certain packages up on risers to allow the packages to be shown together in an interesting set up that also allows a clear view of the images and words on the packaging.
  3. Dimesion. Show the dimension of the products by angling them and accentuating shape so that the packages do not appear flat.
  4. It’s okay to cheat! Who ever said cheating is not allowed? Use what tricks you have up your sleeve to make the photograph look good. These packages were in a shiny plastic covering with the cardboard sleeve on the inside. The plastic was creating such a harsh glare that we removed the packaging cardboard image from the sleeve and taped it to the outside to cut down on glare. We also used little bits of tape here and there to hold the angles of the packages still. So go ahead, cheat!

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Photographing Kids and Animals

W. C. Fields once said “Never work with kids or animals.” Here at Bohm-Marrazzo Photography, we disagree. We work with children and animals on a regular basis because we enjoy it! Don’t be fooled, working with kids and animals is not easy. As fun and warm-hearted people, it’s a natural ability for Linda Bohm and Gerry Marrazzo to be so well-versed in animal training and child wrangling.The combination of photographic expertise and psychology allows for the capture of perfect expressions and poses on those two or four-legged subjects.

Here are some basic tips for photographing, the sometimes hard to manage subjects of animals and children:

  • Patience is a virtue. As obvious as this may sound, it can be easy to lose patience when trying to get a subject who doesn’t understand you to do what you want.
  • Reward them! When using food or toys to get the attention of an animal or kid, allow them to get a little taste or get their hands (or paws) on that toy for a moment to maintain their interest.
  • Mi studio es su casa. Make them feel at home. Creating a comfortable environment where you’re shooting helps to take some stress of the subject.
  • Minimize distractions. Only one person should be trying to get the attention of the subject. When multiple people are calling or waving toys and treats, the animal or kid doesn’t know who to look at creating confusion.
  • Give them (and yourself) a break. If things aren’t going so smoothly and your subject is getting antsy, let them take a few minutes to relax off set.

Happy Shooting! 

 

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Summer Days

Summer is officially here and the heat is starting to rise. It’s time to break out the ice cold lemonade and SPF 50 sunblock. Sometimes the only way to beat the heat on a summer afternoon is to just take a run through the sprinklers. Thanks to the Stewart family for having some fun with us and really capturing the spirit of summer.

Here are a few tips to get some great summer shots:

  1. When shooting outdoor portraiture try using a flash to fill in harsh sunlight shadows.
  2. Keep your camera in a cool place! Don’t leave it to bake in the sun on the dashboard of your car.
  3. Just as you wear sunglasses and baseball caps to protect your eyes, for a little extra shade use a lens hood or a UV filter for your camera.
  4. Make sure to compensate for the deep shadows and bright highlights you get from the noon-time sun.

“Summer afternoon—summer afternoon; to me those have always been the two most beautiful words in the English language.”
 American writer, Henry James

Happy shooting; stay cool!

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