Tag Archives: Portrait Photography

Composition is Key

Composition controls many aspects of a photograph. When making an image the way the photographer frames the image is crucial. In this photograph taken for Saint Peter’s University Hospital, the way that the faces of the subjects are shown in the mirror, while still giving a hint of the rest of their figures in the foreground gives a sense of space and action. The viewer better understands what is going on being able to see that they are in fact standing in front of the mirror. The image captures a very intimate moment of a speech pathologist helping a patient re-learn to speak. Capturing the image in this way leads to a very successful double portrait in which there is a relationship built between the subjects and between the viewer and subjects.

Think about how the way you compose a photograph has an effect on the photographs message. Try to compose in such a way that the whole story is told. Remember to try different angles, distances and crops to find the perfect fit for your image!

Happy Shooting! :]

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Accent!

Color can be used as an accent to any photograph to bring it to life! In this head shot that you see here, we used and sea foam green guitar with the green accents in the  background to create a very coherent image. The combination of the soft green with the earthy dark brown hues in the image is key in the success of the photograph and really works well with the subject’s look!

Try planning your colors when you’re doing a shoot! Making few elements coordinate in color is a successful way to bring everything together to make the image feel complete.

Happy Shooting.

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Gecko Portrait Photography Tips

We’ve all seen the Geico Gecko commercials. However, in real life Gecko’s are not quite so charismatic. They take some work to get their portrait! This gecko seen in Bermuda was a great model, (who has likely had some freelance experience modeling for tourists).
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Don’t fret! You can get a great Gecko portrait too! Here’s how:
  1. Don’t worry about a gecko blinking while taking the photo. Most geckos don’t have eyelids and therefore never blink!
  2. Don’t pose your Gecko subject on anything made of Teflon. It’s the only known surface a gecko’s feet can’t stick to so your model will be sliding all over.
  3. Gecko’s are the only lizards that can vocalize! So don’t be afraid to talk to them while they strut their stuff, they can talk back!
  4. Try to choose a sunny location for your Gecko supermodel. They are coldblooded and need the sun to stay warm!

Happy Shooting!

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